EVENT DETAILS
Thursday, October 8, 2020
PharmCon Online Classroom
Web address to be provided
Dates
8:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Total Credits
16 Contact Hour(s)
Target Audience
Nurse , Pharmacist
Cost
$99.00
Registration closes on 10/10/2020 at 5:30 PM
Early Registration: $99.00
Cost After 9/8/2020: $129.00
On-Site Registration: $190.00
 

Tentative Presentations Include

  • Safety Impacts of Payer Policy (1.0 HOUR)
    •  Aaron Poe and Audrea Szabatura
    •  Objectives to be provided
  • COVID-19 Impact on Oncology Pharmacy Practice (1.0 HOUR)
    •  Sylvia Bartel
    • Objectives to be provided

 

THURSDAY KEYNOTE ADDRESS (with CE credit)
Gratitude in Motion: A True Story of Hope, Determination, and the Everyday Heroes Around Us
Colleen Kelly Alexander, Survivor. Thriver. Motivational Speaker.
Colleen Kelly Alexander  is a lifelong athlete and motivational speaker who inspires positive change, contribution, determination and actionable gratitude. With her indomitable spirit and incredible story of survival, Colleen teaches others how to aim higher, be stronger and use adversity as a catalyst to make the world a better, brighter place.

 

SATURDAY KEYNOTE ADDRESS (with CE credit)
How Did We Get Here? Pharmacy Burnout, Etiology, Consequences, and Solutions
Alex Barker, PharmD, Founder and head coach at TheHappyPharmD.com
Everyone talks about it, but little seems to be accomplished. Burnout appears rampant in all areas of healthcare, but particularly pharmacy regardless of setting. 
What are the unique causes of burnout in pharmacists? What trends are we observing in the literature? Is there hope for pharmacy to become unburned? In this presentation, you will learn the answers to these questions. By the end, you'll have a better understanding of how your institution influences your job satisfaction and ideas on how your work environment could improve. 

 

 
 

AGENDA

Scheduled CE Activities Thursday, October 8, 2020
  
8:50 AM - 9:50 AM
This session seeks to inspire positive change, contribution, determination and actionable gratitude among the pharmacy staff.  Actionable mechanisms are discussed that enable participants to aim higher, be stronger and use adversity as a catalyst for improving patient care.  Having overcome horrific obstacles, the speaker is uniquely qualified to speak to the miraculous power of body, mind, spirit and the phenomenal potential every clinician has to make a positive impact.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Participants will recognize how they fit into the integral puzzle of patient care.
  • Participants will recognize the importance of working cohesively within the medical and social community to provide a wrap around.
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Participants will recognize how they fit into the integral puzzle of patient care.
  • Participants will recognize the importance of working cohesively within the medical and social community to provide a wrap around.
 
Faculty
Colleen AlexanderMotivational Speaker, Athlete
Colleen Kelly Alexander
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-112-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-112-L04-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
It has been estimated that by 2026, biosimilars could lead to an estimated $50 billion reduction in direct spending on biologics in the U.S. Utilization of these agents, however, remains limited for a host of reasons. This session will review a multitude of challenges, including pending litigation and clinical/patient knowledge gaps, which have hindered implementation of biosimilars. Potential benefits of adopting oncology biosimilars will be addressed herein, including how to interpret FDA-required efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity studies. Finally, this session will review strategies for improved integration of biosimilars including considerations for formulary review and their incorporation into treatment pathways. 
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Define the challenges which have been encountered with the advent of oncology biosimilars in the U.S. market
  • Recognize the potential benefits of adopting supportive care and therapeutic oncology biosimilars
  • Identify appropriate strategies for optimal integration of oncology biosimilars into clinical practice
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Define the challenges which have been encountered with the advent of oncology biosimilars in the U.S. market
  • Recognize the potential benefits of adopting supportive care and therapeutic oncology biosimilars
  • Identify appropriate strategies for optimal integration of oncology biosimilars into clinical practice
 
Faculty
Leigh BoehmerPharmd, BCOP
Medical Director, Association of Community Cancer Centers
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-113-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-113-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
Specialty pharmaceuticals are a rapidly expanding market. A growing number of health-systems are leveraging their connection providers and this patient population to build their own specialty pharmacy delivery model. Stakeholders should be mindful of some of the current trends within the specialty pharmacy arena, and this presentation will highlight several of them. Additionally, pharmacists may want to know about some of the advantages that a specialty pharmacy offers with respect to patient care and the coordination of services. These will be reviewed along with some of the current challenges facing those within the specialty pharmacy space. Finally, the fundamental elements of a specialty pharmacy care model will be discussed for those pharmacists interested in understanding the process of implementing such a model within their own health-system. 
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify several current and important trends within specialty pharmacy
  • Describe some of the opportunities and advantages of an integrated health-system specialty pharmacy
  • Recognize key challenges that exist for the health-system specialty pharmacy business model
  • Identify some of the most significant considerations when deciding to build a health-system specialty pharmacy operation
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Identify several current and important trends within specialty pharmacy
  • Describe some of the opportunities and advantages of an integrated health-system specialty pharmacy
  • Recognize key challenges that exist for the health-system specialty pharmacy business model
  • Identify some of the most significant considerations when deciding to build a health-system specialty pharmacy operation
 
Faculty
Jason PoquetteRPh, CSP
Director of Outpatient and Specialty Pharmacy, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-207-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-207-L04-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
1:40 PM - 2:40 PM
This program will provide an overview of FDA approved chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies and their place in therapy.  We will then discuss recent advances in cellular therapies, with updated information about novel targets and investigational products.  Finally, we will discuss the toxicities commonly encountered in patients receiving CAR T-cell therapies and appropriate treatment strategies.  Future directions will also be discussed.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize currently approved CAR (Chimeric Antigen Receptor) T-cell therapies and their place in therapy
  • Identify novel CAR targets and treatments
  • Recognize relevant clinical trial data for CAR therapies in development
  • Recognize common toxicities associated with CAR T-cell therapies and identify appropriate management strategies
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize currently approved CAR (Chimeric Antigen Receptor) T-cell therapies and their place in therapy
  • Identify novel CAR targets and treatments
  • Recognize relevant clinical trial data for CAR therapies in development
  • Recognize common toxicities associated with CAR T-cell therapies and identify appropriate management strategies
 
Faculty
Larry BuiePharmD, BCOP, FASHP
Clinical Pharmacy Manager, Lymphoma and BMT, Residency Program Director, PGY2 Oncology; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-122-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-122-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
The landscapes of the treatment of advanced and metastatic upper and lower gastrointestinal cancers and hepatobiliary cancers are ever changing. Traditional agents have garnered expanded indications and the ability to identify biomarkers that drive the development of GI cancers has added numerous tools to our treatment armamentarium. This presentation will cover recent updates to literature and evidence-based practice in the management of GI cancer patients. Changes to therapy for advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma will be reviewed.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify new treatment modalities used in the setting of advanced or metastatic upper and lower gastrointestinal cancers.
  • Identify new treatment modalities used in the setting of advanced or metastatic hepatobiliary cancers.
  • Compare the efficacy data and toxicity profiles of novel medication regimens for the treatment of various gastrointestinal cancers.
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Identify new treatment modalities used in the setting of advanced or metastatic upper and lower gastrointestinal cancers.
  • Identify new treatment modalities used in the setting of advanced or metastatic hepatobiliary cancers.
  • Compare the efficacy data and toxicity profiles of novel medication regimens for the treatment of various gastrointestinal cancers.
 
Faculty
Jesse MackPharmD, BCPS, BCOP
Clinical Pharmacist Hematology/Oncology, Cone Health Cancer Center
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-116-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-116-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 

Scheduled CE Activities Friday, October 9, 2020
  
The presentation will cover the landmark chemoimmunotherapy trials including FCR (CLL8) and BR (Eichorst, et al. Lancet. 2016). In addition, the landmark studies for the novel front-line agents will be reviewed for ibrutinib (RESONATE-2, ALLIANCE, iLLUMINATE, E1912), acalabrutinib (ELEVATE-TN), and venetoclax (CLL14). After the clinical trials are summarized, toxicity and administration of these front-line treatments will be reviewed to fulfil the second objective. Before transitioning into upcoming clinical data, a patient case(s) will be used to assess the audiences understanding of picking a front-line agent based on specific patient factors. Lastly, CLL remains a rapidly evolving field with many upcoming trials that have the potential to significantly impact front-line treatment of CLL. This will be highlighted in the CAPTIVATE study (ibrutinib + venetoclax), AVO regimen (acalabrutinib + venetolcax + obinutuzumab), LOXO-305, zanubrutinib, and ublituximab/umbralisib. Less time will be spent on the specifics of these clinical trials since only preliminary data is available from ASH. The third objective goal is to highlight the evolving treatment schema that involves novel treatment only, utilizes a time-definitive treatment approach, and targets early MRD negativity.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Compare and contrast the recommended front-line regimens for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)
  • Recognize patient-specific characteristics in the selection of an appropriate front-line treatment regimen for CLL
  • Identify upcoming clinical trials and the potential impact on selection of front-line treatment
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Compare and contrast the recommended front-line regimens for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)
  • Recognize patient-specific characteristics in the selection of an appropriate front-line treatment regimen for CLL
  • Identify upcoming clinical trials and the potential impact on selection of front-line treatment
 
Faculty
Charlene KabelPharmD, BCOP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Leukemia, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-114-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-114-L04-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
This talk will highlight the current landscape of ICIs, their expanded indications to many malignancies, and the current limitations of these drugs due to both primary and secondary resistance. We will also discuss the future of immune checkpoint inhibitors and explore the current development of bi-specific antibodies and adaptive T-cell therapy in solid tumors. This new wave of immunotherapeutics is a promising targeted approach that may overcome tumor resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors by directing the immune cells to their targets on tumor cells. However, this novel approach comes with the cost of severe toxicities including cytokine release syndrome.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the current status of immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) indications
  • Identify trends for the next wave of ICIs including bi-specific antibodies and adaptive T-cell therapy in solid tumors
  • Recognize the toxicities of these novel immunotherapy approaches
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the current status of immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) indications
  • Identify trends for the next wave of ICIs including bi-specific antibodies and adaptive T-cell therapy in solid tumors
  • Recognize the toxicities of these novel immunotherapy approaches
 
Faculty
Osama RahmaMD
Assistant Professor of Medicine Department of Medicine; Harvard Medical School
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-209-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-209-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
The majority of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) will have a response to current treatments, either with conventional chemotherapy agents, transplant or the combination. However, conventional therapies are not curative and most of these patients will ultimately progress. The are a number of new therapies which have recently been approved in the treatment of R/R MM including a selective inhibitor of nuclear export compound, and a Bcl-2 inhibitor.  Newer therapies and first in class treatment are expected to be approved shortly including chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy and bispecific T-cell engager antibody.  These novel agents require careful management of patients as well as precise monitoring for side effects.  The goal of this presentation will be to improve the awareness of new regimens for R/R MM and provide models of care for the management of these therapies side effects.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the clinical significance of new approvals for the treatment of relapsed/refractory(R/R) Multiple Myeloma
  • Summarize new treatment therapies for Multiple myeloma including chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy and bispecific T-cell engager antibody therapy
  • Identify practice-changing data with side effect management that may be effectively employed to manage patients with R/R MM
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the clinical significance of new approvals for the treatment of relapsed/refractory(R/R) Multiple Myeloma
  • Summarize new treatment therapies for Multiple myeloma including chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy and bispecific T-cell engager antibody therapy
  • Identify practice-changing data with side effect management that may be effectively employed to manage patients with R/R MM
 
Faculty
Ali McBridePharmD, MS, BCOP, FAzPA, FASHP
Clinical Coordinator of Hematology/Oncology ,The University of Arizona Cancer Center; Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-123-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-123-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
Sanofi Genzyme
 
This program will focus on the United States Supreme Court case of Rutherford v. United States, in which the court determined that cancer patients could not legally use the unapproved drug laetrile.  Legal principles from the federal Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act will be explained, within the context of this case.  The Abigail Alliance case will also be discussed as context for state and federal “right to try” legislation.  FDA’s expanded access programs will be described, including the recently adopted “Project Facilitate” that has been implemented to broaden eligibility of cancer patients and reduce the workload in qualifying cancer patients for the use of unapproved cancer therapies.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Evaluate legal arguments from the case of Rutherford v. United States, related to the use of unapproved laetrile products by cancer patients.
  • Identify the legal principles applicable to new drug approval and the availability of unapproved new drugs.
  • Compare the "Right to Try" law with the FDA's "Project Facilitate."
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Evaluate legal arguments from the case of Rutherford v. United States, related to the use of unapproved laetrile products by cancer patients.
  • Identify the legal principles applicable to new drug approval and the availability of unapproved new drugs.
  • Compare the "Right to Try" law with the FDA's "Project Facilitate."
 
Faculty
David BrushwoodJD, RPh
Senior Lecturer, University of Wyoming School of Pharmacy
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-119-L03-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-119-L03-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
This session will review recently approved treatments or those recently incorporated into evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of urothelial, kidney, and prostate cancers to provide. Important pharmacologic information will be provided, such as an overview of pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, common adverse events, contraindications, and appropriate monitoring. Key clinical trial information will be discussed and analyzed such that the pharmacist will be able to understand which patients may most benefit from one of these new treatments. Finally, recommendations for managing adverse effects will be provided.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify recently approved or emerging treatments options for urothelial, kidney, and prostate cancers and how they differ from those currently used
  • Recognize the importance of integrating new and/or emerging therapies for treatment of urothelial, kidney, and prostate cancers into the current treatment paradigm
  • Recognize appropriate interventions to prevent and manage adverse effects of these newly approved treatments urothelial, kidney, and prostate cancers
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Identify recently approved or emerging treatments options for urothelial, kidney, and prostate cancers and how they differ from those currently used
  • Recognize the importance of integrating new and/or emerging therapies for treatment of urothelial, kidney, and prostate cancers into the current treatment paradigm
  • Recognize appropriate interventions to prevent and manage adverse effects of these newly approved treatments urothelial, kidney, and prostate cancers
 
Faculty
Lisa HollePharmD, BCOP, FHOPA, ISOPP
Associate Clinical Professor, UConn School of Pharmacy, Storrs, CT
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-115-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-115-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 

Scheduled CE Activities Saturday, October 10, 2020
  
This session will describe the current landscape of herbal supplement use in oncology.  Examples of more commonly used herbals will be discussed in detail.  Resources available to providers and patients will be reviewed and applied to describe how to evaluate products for patient safety, potential efficacy and presence of drug-drug and drug-disease state interactions.  The session will conclude with clinical pearls for discussing herbal use with a patient.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the epidemiology of herbal supplements in oncology
  • Identify the pros and cons of more commonly used herbal supplements
  • Recognize resources available for product evaluation with a focus on safety, efficacy, and potential interactions
  • Identify clinical pearls for discussing herbal supplement use with a patient
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the epidemiology of herbal supplements in oncology
  • Identify the pros and cons of more commonly used herbal supplements
  • Recognize resources available for product evaluation with a focus on safety, efficacy, and potential interactions
  • Identify clinical pearls for discussing herbal supplement use with a patient
 
Faculty
Ashley GlodePharmD, BCOP
Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-125-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-125-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
The treatment of early stage and metastatic breast cancer is constantly evolving. This session will explore the data behind various recent FDA drug approvals for breast cancer and how these approvals change treatment guidelines. In HER2-positive breast cancer, the approval of tucatinib and fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan in the metastatic setting have changed the treatment landscape. Immunotherapy gained approval for metastatic triple negative breast cancer, but only displayed clinical benefit in a subset of patients. Sacituzumab govitecan became the first FDA approved medication specifically for triple negative breast cancer and provides a late stage treatment option for these patients. The session will also discuss other recent FDA approvals in breast cancer and changes to treatment guidelines.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the changing landscape in the treatment of metastatic HER-2 positive breast cancer
  • Determine the role of immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer
  • Indicate the setting and use of recently approved agents for metastatic triple negative and HER2+ breast cancer
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the changing landscape in the treatment of metastatic HER-2 positive breast cancer
  • Determine the role of immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer
  • Indicate the setting and use of recently approved agents for metastatic triple negative and HER2+ breast cancer
 
Faculty
Craig VargoPharmD, BCOP
Specialty Practice Pharmacist - Breast Oncology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center - The James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, OH
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-126-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-126-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 

Everyone talks about it, but little seems to be accomplished. Burnout appears rampant in all areas of healthcare, but particularly pharmacy regardless of setting.

What are the unique causes of burnout in pharmacists? What trends are we observing in the literature? Is there hope for pharmacy to become unburned? In this presentation, you will learn the answers to these questions. By the end, you'll have a better understanding of how your institution influences your job satisfaction and ideas on how your work environment could improve. 

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize job-related stress, burnout, and other psychological issues and trends in pharmacy
  • Identify burnout symptoms, consequences, and causes
  • Determine personal and organizational factors that lead to burnout
  • Specify personal and organizational burnout interventions
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize job-related stress, burnout, and other psychological issues and trends in pharmacy
  • Identify burnout symptoms, consequences, and causes
  • Determine personal and organizational factors that lead to burnout
  • Specify personal and organizational burnout interventions
 
Faculty
Alex BarkerPharmD
Founder, The Happy PharmD
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-120-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-120-L04-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
The integration of targeted therapeutics into cancer care has transformed the field and provided patients with better outcomes. This logarithmic growth in the number of unique mechanisms of action of anti-tumor agents has led to an increased need for pathway competence as a clinical pharmacist to help to optimize therapy. A better understanding of upstream and downstream regulators of drug targets help to inform rational adverse effect profiles, mechanisms of drug resistance, as well as potential sensitivity for off-label drug use. In this session, we will discuss some of the most commonly targeted pathways in cancer care and how to utilize this knowledge to provide the highest level of patient care possible.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Define the action of molecular pathways in oncology
  • Recognize common oncogenic pathways and their regulatory consequences
  • Connect common therapeutic targets with upstream and downstream regulators
  • Integrate molecular system connections with rational clinical outcomes
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Define the action of molecular pathways in oncology
  • Recognize common oncogenic pathways and their regulatory consequences
  • Connect common therapeutic targets with upstream and downstream regulators
  • Integrate molecular system connections with rational clinical outcomes
 
Faculty
Nathan SeligsonBS, PharmD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, Diversion of Translational Research, The University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-124-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-124-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
USP <800> was published in 2016 and became official in 2019.  It is designed to protect patients, personnel, and the environment.  Required elements include facility issues, personnel training, use of closed system drug-transfer devices, and work practices that support containment and elimination of hazards.  This session will review strategies to improve compliance of the essential protective components.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize how the NIOSH Hierarchy of Risk applies to <800>
  • Identify the key facility components required by <800>
  • Cite resources to assess closed system drug-transfer devices
  • State three work practices that support containment of hazardous drugs
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize how the NIOSH Hierarchy of Risk applies to <800>
  • Identify the key facility components required by <800>
  • Cite resources to assess closed system drug-transfer devices
  • State three work practices that support containment of hazardous drugs
 
Faculty
Patricia KienleRPh, MPA, FASHP
Director of Accreditation and Medication Safety, Cardinal Health Innovative Delivery Solutions
 
ACPE UAN
0798-0000-20-121-L07-P (Knowledge-Based)
0798-0000-20-121-L07-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon
 
 
 
 
Requirements for CE Credit
  • Participant Requirement and Statement of Credit: To receive credit, participants must fully attend each session (no partial credit will be awarded), pass in a completed attendance verification form, and using the access code provided, complete the online evaluation for each session attended. Attendance will be verified. All participants will have the opportunity to evaluate the educational sessions and presenters.
  • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians: CE credit will be automatically uploaded to CPE Monitor upon completion of the evaluation and posted to the participant’s NABP account within 72 hours where an official certificate of credit can be printed. Evaluations must be completed within 60 days of program date to receive credit.
  • Statement of Disclosure: Disclosure will be made on the day of the program regarding any interest or affiliation a speaker may have with a supporting organization.
  • Refund Policy: A full refund will be provided only if a written request is received by American Health Resources, LLC at least 48 hours prior to the program or if the program is cancelled. American Health Resources, LLC reserves the right to change the presenters, topics or seminar schedules.
 
Only Certificates of Credit issued from CPE Monitor are valid in the US.
CPE Monitor will not accept credits after 60 days from the session date.
 
Supported By:
PharmCon, Sanofi Genzyme
 
Registration closes on 10/10/2020 at 5:30 PM
 

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